U. S. Judge Reinstates Rocky Mountain Gray Wolf Conservation

Gray Wolf Conservation From U.S. Fish And Wildlife Service

A U.S. District Judge has concluded that the arbitrary removal of the Gray Wolf from the endangered species list by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in April 2009 in only two states, Montana and Idaho was in violation of the Endangered Species Act. In his statement, he stated that the law requires any decision that is made must include the entire species and not just a selection of that species.

The ruling from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in April of 2009 determined that because the gray wolf population was at 1,500, and that they were thriving in both Montana and Idaho, they would be taken off the list in these two states. But the gray wolf protection laws in Wyoming were not being effectively regulated. So, they left the “endangered” moniker on Gray Wolves in Wyoming.

Because of the decision in April 2009, the Federal Government was sued by Defenders of Wildlife, the Greater Yellowstone Coalition, EarthJustice, as well as, other advocates of Gray Wolf Conservation.

Gray wolves were put on the endangered species list in 1974 and after a reintroduction program in the 1990s in both Idaho and Yellowstone National Park, the species population has grown to over 1,700 in the region.

There were planned Gray Wolf hunts this fall in both Montana and Idaho; but, because of this ruling, they have been put on hold.

Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Fish and Wildlife and Parks, Tom Strickland issued a statement regarding the decision from U.S. District Judge, Donald Molloy. In it Mr. Strickland stated, “Despite this extraordinary success, today’s ruling means that until Wyoming brings its wolf management program into alignment with those of Idaho and Montana, the wolf will remain under the protection of the Endangered Species Act throughout the northern Rocky Mountains.”

The Rocky Mountain Gray Wolf Conservation program has been a great success. In fact it has surpassed many of the recovery plan targets. With this new ruling, the Gray Wolf population will continue to be protected in all parts of the Northern Rocky Mountains.

Update:

Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Fish and Wildlife and Parks Tom Strickland has issued a new press release, “Today’s ruling makes it clear this wolf population cannot be delisted until the State of Wyoming has instituted an adequate management program, similar to those of Idaho and Montana.”  Mr. Strickland also revealed that the Rocky Mountain Gray Wolf,  “will remain under the protection of the Endangered Species Act.”

Note: Picture of Gray Wolf From U.S. Fish And Wildlife Service

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